News Story: Full Text
Sponsored By
NovoCure Trial
Please Click On The Above Banner For More Details
Braintumor Website

 

Thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression for protection against hypothyroidism due to craniospinal irradiation for childhood medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor.


Posted on: 02/17/2008

Thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression for protection against
hypothyroidism due to craniospinal irradiation for childhood
medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor.


Massimino Gandola L, Collini P Seregni E, Marchianò , Serra A,
Pignoli , Spreafico F Pallotti F, Terenziani M, Biassoni
Bombardieri E Fossati-Bellani F.
Department of Pediatrics, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale
Tumori, Milan, Italy. maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Oct 1;69(2):404-10. Epub 2007 Jul
2.


PURPOSE: Hypothyroidism is one of the earliest endocrine effects of
craniospinal irradiation (CSI). The effects of radiation also depend
on circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which acts as an
indicator of thyrocyte function and is the most sensitive marker of
thyroid damage. Hence, our study was launched in 1998 to evaluate
the protective effect of TSH suppression during CSI for
medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor. PATIENTS AND

METHODS: From Jan 1998 to Feb 2001, a total of 37 euthyroid children
scheduled for CSI for medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal
tumor underwent thyroid ultrasound and free triiodothyronine (FT3),
free thyroxine (FT4), and TSH evaluation at the beginning and end of
CSI. From 14 days before and up to the end of CSI, patients were
administered l-thyroxine at suppressive doses; every 3 days, TSH
suppression was checked to ensure a value <0.3 mum/ml. During follow-
up, blood tests and ultrasound were repeated after 1 year; primary
hypothyroidism was considered an increased TSH level greater than
normal range. CSI was done using a hyperfractionated accelerated
technique with total doses ranging from 20.8-39 Gy; models were used
to evaluate doses received by the thyroid bed.

 RESULTS: Of 37 patients, 25 were alive a median 7 years after CSI. They were well
matched for all clinical features, except that eight children
underwent adequate TSH suppression during CSI, whereas 17 did not.
Hypothyroidism-free survival rates were 70% for the "adequately TSH-
suppressed" group and 20% for the "inadequately TSH-suppressed"
group (p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS: Thyroid-stimulating hormone
suppression with l-thyroxine had a protective effect on thyroid
function at long-term follow-up. This is the first demonstration
that transient endocrine suppression of thyroid activity may protect
against radiation-induced functional damage

 

Click HERE to return to brain tumor news headlines


Home | Brain Tumor Guide | FAQs | Find A Treatment
Noteworthy Treatments | News | Virtual Trial | Videos | Novocure Optune® | Newsletter
Donations | Brain Tumor Centers | Survivor Stories | Temodar®
Fundraising For Research | Unsubscribe | Contact Us

Copyright (c) 1993 - 2019 by:
The Musella Foundation For Brain Tumor Research & Information, Inc
1100 Peninsula Blvd
Hewlett, NY 11557
888-295-4740