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Inhibition of cathepsin B and MMP-9 gene expression in glioblastoma cell line via RNA interference reduces tumor cell invasion, tumor growth and angiogenesis


Posted on: 06/22/2004

Inhibition of cathepsin B and MMP-9 gene expression in glioblastoma cell line via RNA interference reduces tumor cell invasion, tumor growth and angiogenesis

Oncogene (2004) 23, 4681-4689. doi:10.1038/sj.onc.1207616 Published online 3 May 2004

10 June 2004, Volume 23, Number 27, Pages 4681-4689

Original Paper

Sajani S Lakka1, Christopher S Gondi1, Niranjan Yanamandra1, William C Olivero2, Dzung H Dinh2, Meena Gujrati3 and Jasti S Rao1,2

1Program of Cancer Biology, Department of Biomedical and Therapeutic Sciences, University of Illinois, Peoria, IL, USA

2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois, Peoria, IL, USA

3Department of Pathology, University of Illinois, Peoria, IL, USA

Correspondence to: JS Rao, Program of Cancer Biology, Department of Biomedical and Therapeutic Sciences, The University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Box 1649, Peoria, IL 61656, USA. E-mail: jsrao@uic.edu

Abstract

Extracellular proteases have been shown to cooperatively influence matrix degradation and tumor cell invasion through proteolytic cascades, with individual proteases having distinct roles in tumor growth, invasion, migration and angiogenesis. Matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-9 and cathepsin B have been shown to participate in the processes of tumor growth, vascularization and invasion of gliomas. In the present study, we used a cytomegalovirus promoter-driven DNA template approach to induce hairpin RNA (hpRNA)-triggered RNA interference (RNAi) to block MMP-9 and cathepsin B gene expression with a single construct. Transfection of a plasmid vector-expressing double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for MMP-9 and cathepsin B significantly inhibited MMP-9 and cathepsin B expression and reduced the invasive behavior of SNB19, glioblastoma cell line in Matrigel and spheroid invasion models. Downregulation of MMP-9 and cathepsin B using RNAi in SNB19 cells reduced cell-cell interaction of human microvascular endothelial cells, resulting in the disruption of capillary network formation in both in vitro and in vivo models. Direct intratumoral injections of plasmid DNA expressing hpRNA for MMP-9 and cathepsin B significantly inhibited established glioma tumor growth and invasion in intracranial tumors in vivo. Further intraperitoneal (ip) injections of plasmid DNA expressing hpRNA for MMP-9 and cathepsin B completely regressed pre-established tumors for a long time (4 months) without any indication of these tumor cells. For the first time, these observations demonstrate that the simultaneous RNAi-mediated targeting of MMP-9 and cathepsin B has potential application for the treatment of human gliomas.


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