News Story: Full Text
Sponsored By
Cedars-Siani Medical Center Brain Tumor Program
Please Click On The Above Banner For More Details
Braintumor Website

 

WORK OF CLEVELAND CLINIC RESEARCHERS MAY LEAD TO A BLOOD TEST FOR BRAIN TUMOR DIAGNOSIS


Posted on: 06/20/2003

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Raquel Santiago 216-444-4235

Monday, June 2, 2003

James Armstrong, 216-444-9455

WORK OF CLEVELAND CLINIC RESEARCHERS MAY LEAD TO A BLOOD TEST FOR BRAIN TUMOR DIAGNOSIS

Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that elevated serum levels of the protein S100ƒÒ could be an indication of a brain tumor or of extensive disruption to a person¡¦s blood-brain barrier, the mechanism that protects the brain from foreign substances and, sometimes, useful therapeutic agents.

S100ƒÒ, a protein found in brain cells, typically exists in low or even undetectable levels in a person¡¦s blood serum. In the event of a brain injury, however, S100ƒÒ leaks into cerebrospinal fluids and subsequently can be detected in the serum. ¡§More than just signaling a brain injury, high levels of S100B in the bloodstream show the breakdown of the body¡¦s blood-brain barrier,¡¨ said Damir Janigro, Ph.D., director of the Cerebrovascular Center at The Cleveland Clinic.

Results of the research will be published in the June 1 edition of the journal Cancer.

¡§This research is significant because it provides the basis for developing a blood test for the diagnosis of brain tumors,¡¨ said the study's lead researcher, Andrew A. Kanner, M.D., a neurosurgeon and researcher in the Center of Translational Therapeutics and the Cerebral Vascular Laboratory in The Cleveland Clinic¡¦s Brain Tumor Institute.

¡§Such a blood test could do for the diagnosis and follow up of primary and metastatic brain tumors what the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test has done for the detection of prostate cancer,¡¨ Dr. Kanner said. ¡§It also could provide a more cost-effective alternative to using an MRI to follow patients with known brain tumors.¡¨

In addition, the researchers¡¦ findings could be used in the development of a tool or objective measure to assess when the body may be more or less receptive to pharmacological treatment or to further evaluate patients at risk for brain tumors associated with blood-brain barrier disruption, he said.

Dr. Kanner and Dr. Janigro led the team of 12 researchers that studied serum S100ƒÒ levels in six patients undergoing blood-brain barrier disruption for intra-arterial chemotherapy for primary central nervous system lymphoma. An additional 53 serum samples were measured in patients with a variety of primary or metastatic brain lesions at the time of neuroimaging.

Future research will better determine the specificity of S100ƒÒ as a marker for the disruption of the blood-brain barrier and the early detection of brain tumors.

The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, founded in 1921, integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education in a private, not-for-profit group practice. Approximately 1,100 full-time salaried physicians at The Cleveland Clinic and Cleveland Clinic Florida represent more than 100 medical specialties and subspecialties. In 2001, there were more than 2.25 million outpatient visits to The Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Patients came for treatment from every state and from more than 80 countries. There were nearly 52,000 hospital admissions to The Cleveland Clinic in 2001. The Cleveland Clinic website address is www.clevelandclinic.org


Click HERE to return to brain tumor news headlines


Home | Brain Tumor Guide | FAQs | Find A Treatment
Noteworthy Treatments | News | Virtual Trial | Videos | Novocure Optune® | Newsletter
Donations | Brain Tumor Centers | Survivor Stories | Temodar®
Fundraising For Research | Unsubscribe | Contact Us

Copyright (c) 1993 - 2019 by:
The Musella Foundation For Brain Tumor Research & Information, Inc
1100 Peninsula Blvd
Hewlett, NY 11557
888-295-4740